UC San Diego SearchMenu

Minor in International Migration Studies (IMS)

Offered by Eleanor Roosevelt College


This minor program is the first undergraduate instructional program with this focus offered at any university in the United States. This minor will give students an in-depth understanding of the causes, politics, and social consequences of international migration from a broad comparative perspective. This program of study will help to prepare students for a variety of careers, including research and teaching, immigrant service-providing organizations, government agencies, and law. The unique research and writing opportunities offered by this minor also provide excellent preparation for graduate school.

The minor is interdisciplinary in content and method. It covers a wide range of topics, including the economic, cultural, demographic, and political impacts of immigration; laws and government policies for controlling immigration and refugee flows, and the outcomes of these laws and policies; ethnic, gender, citizenship, and transnational dimensions of immigration; the integration of immigrant and ethnic minorities; and immigrant history and literature. Students learn about other countries of immigration (especially in Western Europe and East Asia) in order to place the U.S. experience in comparative perspective.

Students taking this minor are also encouraged to attend research seminars hosted by the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies (CCIS) in which UCSD faculty, CCIS visiting research fellows, and non-local immigration experts present their most recent research. These seminars are held throughout the academic year in the conference room on the ground floor of the ERC Academic Administration Building.

REQUIRED COURSES FOR THE MINOR

The minor consists of at least twenty-eight (28) units total, all of which must be taken for letter grade (with the exception of Academic Internship Program (AIP) courses and 199 courses). Students may use the IMS Minor Requirements Worksheet to assist them in planning out their courses.
  1. One lower-division course from the following list is required. These courses provide background for understanding immigration to the United States and an appreciation of the ethnic and cultural diversity that immigrants have created. Other courses with similar content may be considered, by petition, to satisfy this requirement.

    • ANTH 23 - Debating Multiculturalism: Race, Ethnicity, & Class in American Societies (4)
    • DOC 2 - Dimensions of Culture: Justice (6)
    • ETHN 1A - Introduction to Ethnic Studies: Population Histories of the United States (4)
    • ETHN 1B - Introduction to Ethnic Studies: Immigration & Assimilation in American Life (4)
    • HILD 7A - Race and Ethnicity in the United States (4)
    • HILD 7B - Race and Ethnicity in the United States (4)
    • HILD 7C - Race and Ethnicity in the United States (4)
    • POLI 40 - Introduction to Law and Society (4)
  2. One upper-division immigration course using a comparative, cross-national approach is required from the following list. These courses provide a broad perspective on the social, economic, and political aspects of immigration and expose students to the experiences of countries of immigration other than the United States. (Prerequisites: upper-division standing required)

    • POLI 150A - The Politics of Immigration (4)
    • SOCI 125 - Sociology of Immigration (4)
  3. An additional twenty (20) more required units by pursuing one of three separate tracks:

    • Track A - Course Work (5 courses)
    • Track B - Independent Research or Internship (5 courses)
    • Track C - Field Research (3 courses)

TRACK A - COURSE WORK

After completing Requirements 1 and 2 (see see REQUIRED COURSES FOR THE MINOR above), students can choose to take five additional courses (four of which must be upper-division) from our list of approved courses in the UCSD Catalog. These courses provide in-depth coverage of specialized topics in immigration studies.

Students using Track A may not take more than a total of four courses from any one department for this minor.

Planning to Study Abroad?

Because of the international nature of the minor, students will be allowed to complete up to three courses (12 units) for their minor requirements through study abroad, especially in the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and Mexico, countries where immigration studies programs are now well-established. Visit the Programs Abroad Office (PAO) for assistance in finding courses abroad.

TRACK B - INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (199) OR INTERNSHIP (AIP)

After completing Requirements 1 and 2 (see REQUIRED COURSES FOR THE MINOR above), students may choose to complete their minor by doing independent research or internships. Students choosing this track will receive intensive training through academic internships in a local immigrant/refugee service-providing organization or conduct independent research in the area. 

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (199)

Students who choose this option are required to take one upper-division research methods course from the following:

  • ETHN 190 - Research Methods: Studying Racial and Ethnic Communities (4). (Crosslisted: USP 129)
  • SOCI 104 - Field Research: Methods of Participant Observation (4). (Prerequisite: SOCI 60)
  • SOCI 108 - Survey Research Design (4). (Prerequisite: SOCI 60)

Students will complete the remaining sixteen (16) units for this track through a combination of:

  • Courses from the list under Track A and,
  • Completing one or two "199: Independent Studies" courses (4 units each) in order to pursue a field research project with a faculty member.

Field research must be in a local immigrant community and include a substantial research paper based on this fieldwork. 199 courses may be taken for P/NP for this minor.

INTERNSHIP (AIP)*

Students who choose this option are required to take one upper-division research methods course from the following:

  • ETHN 190 - Research Methods: Studying Racial and Ethnic Communities (4). (Crosslisted: USP 129)
  • SOCI 104 - Field Research: Methods of Participant Observation (4). (Prerequisite: SOCI 60)
  • SOCI 108 - Survey Research Design (4). (Prerequisite: SOCI 60)

Students will complete the remaining sixteen (16) units for this track through a combination of:

  • Courses from the list under Track A and,
  • Completing an internship in a non-governmental organzation/agency that services immigrants or refugees in the San Diego area. Internships for up to eight units will be arranged by the Academic Internship Program (AIP).

*Note: Students choosing this option must be eligible for and follow AIP deadlines and guidelines. AIP courses may be taken for P/NP for this minor.

ADDITIONAL INDEPENDENT RESEARCH / INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES:

TRACK C - FIELD RESEARCH

After completing Requirements 1 and 2 (see REQUIRED COURSES FOR THE MINOR above), students may choose an intensive training in field research methods, appropriate for studying international migration, and conduct field research in immigrant communities.

Note: Students choosing this option must apply, and be accepted, to the Mexican Migration Field Research Program (MMFRP). Students must follow MMFRP deadlines and guidelines. Advanced competency in conversational Spanish is recommended for this option.

Students who choose this option and have been accepted to MMFRP will take the following consecutive three-course sequence. These courses provide students with field research methods training and allow them to go to Mexico for three weeks to conduct research and analyze data in a rural community that sends migrant workers to the United States:

  • LATI 122A - Field Research Methods for Migration Studies: Seminar (4). (Offered: Fall Quarter, Prerequisite: permission of instructor, department authorization required, may not receive credit for both SOCI 122A and LATI 122A)
  • LATI 122B - Field Research Methods for Migration Studies: Practicum (12). (Offered: Winter Quarter, Prerequisite: permission of instructor, department authorization required, may not receive credit for both SOCI 122B and LATI 122B)
  • LATI 122C - Field Research Methods for Migration Studies: Data Analysis (4) (Offered: Spring Quarter, Prerequisite: permission of instructor, department authorization required, LATI 122B)

MMFRP Resources

DECLARING THE MINOR

This minor is open to all undergraduate UC San Diego students.

To declare the minor, students must use the Major/Minor Tool in Tritonlink and input the seven courses or 28 units they plan on using to complete the minor (see REQUIRED COURSES FOR THE MINOR above for details). Students may also use the IMS Minor Requirements Worksheet to assist them in planning out their courses.

Facts About Minors:

  • Lower-division classes can apply to both your major, GE requirements, and your minor.
  • Students cannot overlap upper-division courses for their minor and major requirements.
  • Students cannot overlap upper-division courses for their minor and any other minor requirements.
  • Because AIP 197 and 199 courses are offered as Pass/No Pass, students must be careful not to exceed the 25% limit. Each student should check with their college to determine their Pass/No Pass eligibility.
  • Minors are considered optional and are not required for graduation. The approval of a minor is based on the assumption that the student will complete degree requirements (including the minor) within the Maximum Unit Limitation regulation. Your college reserves the right to require you to rescind a minor if not completed within this unit limitation. If you are unsure whether a minor fits into your graduation plan, please make an appointment with your college academic advisor.

Minors

IMS Minor Contact

IMS Minor Advisor:

Baramee Peper Anan, M.A.
Senior Academic Counselor
Eleanor Roosevelt College

Questions?

Visit the IMS Minor VAC